Tag Archives: 17th Australian Infantry Brigade

We Intend to Cease Fighting – A Japanese Unit Surrender, May 1945, New Guinea.

Anyone who has done some cursory reading about the Second World War in the Pacific will know that for the Japanese soldier, surrendering to their enemy was not an officially sanctioned option. While the surrender of individuals and small groups certainly occurred, it was unusual for units of Japanese to lay down their arms on the order of

Supply in the Jungle (New Guinea, 1943) – By Indigenous Feet.*

In my post Supply in the Jungle – By Air I began to refer to the difficulties involved in supplying soldiers, using the Third Australian Division in the Wau-Salamaua, New Guinea, campaign of 1943 as an example. Once aircraft – if they were available – had ‘dropped’ the required supplies, however, they still needed to be transported to

Supply in the Jungle – by Air.

Conventional wisdom has it that the Second World War in the Pacific was won by the Allies in two ways: supremacy in the air, and supremacy, or at least effectiveness, in the means and methods of supply. The air war in the Pacific, particularly in the South-West Pacific Area where Australian air and ground forces operated, has received

Wandumi, New Guinea, the 29th of January, 1943 – An Introduction.

2345 hours [11:45pm] 29th January, 1943, Wau, New Guinea: “Sitrep from Kanga stated at 0930 in the Wandumi area enemy strength was estimated to be from 300 to 500 on our direct front and large numbers by-passing fwd positions.” A ‘sitrep’ was a Situation Report and ‘Kanga’ was the name of the local area military headquarters which had

The U.S. 162nd Infantry R.C.T. at Nassau Bay – The Wau-Salamaua Campaign Part I.

In the first minutes of the 30th of June, 1943, seventy years ago today, men from the 1st Battalion of the United States’ 162nd Infantry Regimental Combat Team stumbled ashore through heavy surf at a place called Nassau Bay in the then Australian Mandated Territory of New Guinea. Guided in to their objective by a platoon from the