Tag Archives: Mubo

Australian Independent Company Commander – Brigadier T.F.B. MacAdie D.S.O., C.B.E. (2/7th Aust. Ind. Coy).

Of the eight Australian Independent Companies formed in the first half of the Second World War, only one, the 2/7th, is not represented by a formal, published unit history. This means that not only is there no substantial narrative – aside from occasional personal anecdotes available on internet sites such as that of the 2/6th Cavalry Commando Regiment

2/7th Australian Independent Company (Part II).

When we left Part I, the 2/7th Australian Independent Company was undergoing specialist training at the Guerilla Warfare School at Wilson’s Promontory, Victoria. With the war in Papua far to the north still very much in the balance, MacAdie’s company was destined to be committed to action as soon as it was considerable capable. Though their activities never

Supply in the Jungle – by Air.

Conventional wisdom has it that the Second World War in the Pacific was won by the Allies in two ways: supremacy in the air, and supremacy, or at least effectiveness, in the means and methods of supply. The air war in the Pacific, particularly in the South-West Pacific Area where Australian air and ground forces operated, has received

Unexpected Dangers – Tragedy Strikes from the Air.

I came across an old letter from a relative recently, and when re-reading it discovered his mention of a man he had known in pre-war life who had been killed in an accident just one week before the end of the conflict in the Pacific. I find these tragedies rather poignant: Darrel Smith was born in Pingelly, Western

Indigenous Recognition – Papua and New Guinea, WW2.

There exists in some circles the belief that the indigenous people of Papua and New Guinea who helped the Allied cause in the Second World War were ignored and their service unacknowledged in any way. A quick and easy search of the records of the Australian New Guinea Administrative Unit – the organisation that administered the welfare of

The U.S. 162nd Infantry R.C.T. at Nassau Bay – The Wau-Salamaua Campaign Part I.

In the first minutes of the 30th of June, 1943, seventy years ago today, men from the 1st Battalion of the United States’ 162nd Infantry Regimental Combat Team stumbled ashore through heavy surf at a place called Nassau Bay in the then Australian Mandated Territory of New Guinea. Guided in to their objective by a platoon from the