Tag Archives: New Guinea

Still No Bodies, But Slightly Less of a Mystery.

In my post Never Returned – Disappearance in the Markham, I introduced three Australian soldiers who went missing, presumed captured by the enemy, in New Guinea in mid 1942, and whose bodies were never found. At the time of writing, I was aware of indigenous intelligence that had stated that two of the men, Sergeant Mayne and Signalman

We Intend to Cease Fighting – A Japanese Unit Surrender, May 1945, New Guinea.

Anyone who has done some cursory reading about the Second World War in the Pacific will know that for the Japanese soldier, surrendering to their enemy was not an officially sanctioned option. While the surrender of individuals and small groups certainly occurred, it was unusual for units of Japanese to lay down their arms on the order of

Guns and ‘Dirty’ Gold: A New Guinea Invasion-Time Mystery.

Prior to the Second World War in the Pacific, the territories of Papua and New Guinea to the north of Australia had been the scene of several gold rushes. One such area that was still being worked at the outbreak of the war was the Wau-Bulolo Valley in the Mandated Territory of New Guinea. It was here, during

Wandumi, New Guinea, the 29th of January, 1943 – An Introduction.

2345 hours [11:45pm] 29th January, 1943, Wau, New Guinea: “Sitrep from Kanga stated at 0930 in the Wandumi area enemy strength was estimated to be from 300 to 500 on our direct front and large numbers by-passing fwd positions.” A ‘sitrep’ was a Situation Report and ‘Kanga’ was the name of the local area military headquarters which had

Chemical Warfare in the South West Pacific Area.

There is no public record of chemical warfare agents being used by either the Australians and Americans or their enemies of the time, the Japanese, in the war in the South West Pacific during World War Two. This is not to say, however, that both sides were not prepared for such an eventuality. After the widespread use of

The N.G.V.R. and the workings of a 19th Century British Regiment – My Bookshelf Part V.

“The New Guinea Volunteer Rifles NGVR 1939 – 1943, A History” by Ian Downs is vital reading for anyone who wishes to obtain an understanding of the events of the first tentative months of WW2 in the South-West Pacific Area. The NGVR were a small territorial force raised in what was then the Mandated Territory of New Guinea

The U.S. 162nd Infantry R.C.T. at Nassau Bay – The Wau-Salamaua Campaign Part I.

In the first minutes of the 30th of June, 1943, seventy years ago today, men from the 1st Battalion of the United States’ 162nd Infantry Regimental Combat Team stumbled ashore through heavy surf at a place called Nassau Bay in the then Australian Mandated Territory of New Guinea. Guided in to their objective by a platoon from the